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Daily PIB Analysis For UPSC/IAS | Download PDF

Date: 06 May 2019

MCQ

  • VELA is a
  1. Robot
  2. Supercomputer
  3. Scorpene class submarine
  4. Artillary Gun

Ministry of Defence

  • Launch of Fourth Scorpene Class Submarine – VELA
  • Vela, the fourth Scorpene class submarine being constructed by Mazagon Dock Shipbuilders Limited for the Indian Navy, was launched today, on 06 May 2019, by Mrs Veena Ajay Kumar, wife of Dr Ajay Kumar, IAS, Secretary Defence Production, who was the Chief Guest on the occasion. VAdm AK Saxena, CWP&A was also present during the launching ceremony. This event reaffirms the steps taken by Mazagon Dock Shipbuilders Ltd (MDL) in the ongoing ‘Make In India’ programme, which is being actively implemented by the Department of Defence Production (MoD).
  • The submarine was towed to Mumbai Port Trust, for separation from the pontoon, after which she will undergo rigorous trials and tests, both in harbour and at sea before delivery to the Indian Navy.
  • The contract for the construction and Transfer-of-Technology for six Scorpene class submarines in series, has M/s Naval Group (formerly DCNS) of France as ‘Collaborator’ and are being built by MDL.
  • Cmde Rakesh Anand, Chairman and Managing Director, MDL said on the occasion that with the launching of the P15 B Destroyer ‘Imphal’ on 20 April 2019 and the, launching of Vela on 06 May 2019, were indeed some of the major events for MDL so far this year.
  • Presently Eight Warships and five submarines are under construction at MDL. MDL is one of the India’s leading shipyards with a capacity to meet requirements of the Indian Navy.
  • The Scorpene class of submarines can undertake multifarious tasks typically undertaken by any modern submarine which include anti-surface as well as anti-submarine warfare. The transfer of technology involves appropriate technical support by Naval Group to MDL in the field of construction, integration and tests of the submarines in India which is achieved through transfer of technical data package to MDL through information system as well as on job training to MDL’s personnel on critical technologies.
  • Leveraging the experience and the transfer-of-technology of the Scorpene project, with enhanced and upgraded infrastructure, MDL, is ready for undertaking construction of the future submarines.

MCQ

  1. Supreme Court (SC) disapproves live-streaming of court proceedings and directed the centre not to frame rules for this.
  2. Live-streaming has been allowed for both Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha proceedings since 2004.
  • Choose correct

(A) Only 1

(B) Only 2

(C) Both

(D) None

  • Supreme Court (SC) approves live-streaming of court proceedings and directed the centre to frame rules for this.

More on the News:

  • The SC agreed that live-streaming of court proceedings would serve as an instrument for greater accountability and formed part of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973.
  • The SC held that the right to justice under Article 21 of the Constitution would be meaningful only if the public gets access to the proceedings and to witness proceedings live.

Arguments in favour

  • Concept of open courts: Indian legal system is built on the concept of open courts, which means that the proceedings are open to all members of the public.
  • To promote transparency: Live-streaming has been allowed for both Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha proceedings since 2004.
  • Lack of physical Infrastructure: On any given day, only a handful of people can be physically present and are allowed in the courtroom.
  • Digitization: While the courts are opting for digitisation, with online records of all cases, filing FIRs online etc. there is a need to make live streaming of the proceedings also.
  • Public Interest Issues: Matters which have a bearing on important public interest issues such as entry of women to the Sabarimala temple, or the scope of the right to the choice of one’s food should be available for all to watch which helps to build the right perception.

Arguments against

  • The unwanted public gaze caused by live-streaming will tend to make judges subject to popular public opinion and accountable to the general public.
  • The role of the judiciary cannot be equated with the roles of the legislature and the executive. The broadcasting of parliamentary proceedings may be good for ensuring accountability, this is not the case with the courts.
  • The individuality of judges is more likely to become a subject of public debate through live-streaming, creating problems of its own. The focus should be on the judgment delivered.
  • There is a greater likelihood of lawyers aspiring to publicise themselves tend to address not only the judges but also the public watching them which will hamper their objectivity.
  • Instead of live-streaming, audio and video recordings of court proceedings would reform the administration of justice. These can be used at the time of review or appeal of a case.

MCQ

  • About Gram Panchayat Development Plan (GPDP)
  1. It is an annual plan of each panchayat where the District Collector would decide where the money should be spent.
  2. The Gram Panchayat Development Plan aims to strengthen the role of 31 lakh elected Panchayat leaders and 2.5 crore SHG Women under DAYNRLM in effective gram sabha.
  • Choose correct

(A) Only 1

(B) Only 2

(C) Both

(D) None

  • Recently, the central government launched a campaign, Sabki Yojana, Sabka Vikas on October 2.

About Sabki Yojana Sabka Vikas campaign

  • The campaign will involve people at the grassroots while preparing structured gram panchayat development plans.
  • It will also involve thorough audit of the works done in the last few years.
  • Under the campaign, which will conclude in December this year, gram panchayats will have to publicly display all sources of funds collected and their annual spending, along with future development initiatives.
  • This would help in making the exercise of formulating Gram panchayat development plans more structured which has been largely unorganized till now.

About Gram Panchayat Development Plan (GPDP):

  • It is an annual plan of each panchayat where the villagers would decide where the money should be spent.
  • The Gram Panchayat Development Plan aims to strengthen the role of 31 lakh elected Panchayat leaders and 2.5 crore SHG Women under DAY-NRLM in effective gram sabha.

Significance of GPDP

  • Stakeholder involvement: Judicious planning with involvement of all stakeholders is critical for success of any activity. Community involvement leads to quality works and acceptance by local inhabitants
  • Consolidation of all financial resources at Gram Panchayat (GP) level: Pooling of resources helps in optimum outcomes.
  • Development works: They are undertaken in prioritized manner through collective visioning. It also helps to reach marginalized sections and achieve specific development goals within a specified time-frame.
  • Responsive government: It activates PRI level bureaucracy and also strengthens bond between government, GP & local inhabitants leading to responsive government.

MCQ

  • Japan has been a leading financial donor in the form of ODA (Official Development Assistance) to India. Projects under it which were financed by Japan
  1. Delhi-kolkata Freight Corridor,
  2. Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor,
  3. Chennai-Bangalore Industrial Corridor and the
  4. Ahmedabad-Mumbai High Speed Rail system.

(A) All

(B) None

(C) 1,2,3

(D) 2,3,4

  • Indian PM recently visited Tokyo for the 13th Indo – Japan annual bilateral summit and issued a joint vision statement.

Areas of Cooperation

  • Increased Economic Cooperation - The biggest take away was the $75 billion currency swap that Japan Offered to India 50 percent higher than the last swap.
  •  Both appreciated the progress made under Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) signed in 2011 as it has helped in boosting bilateral trade.
  •  Japan had pledged Rs 33,800 crore in government and private sector investments.
  •  Japan has been one of the biggest sources of investment flows into India, accounting for $28.16 billion in FDI between April 2000 and June 2018.
  • Connectivity through Huge Infrastructure projects
  • Within India- Japan has been a leading financial donor in the form of ODA (Official Development Assistance) to India.
  • ✓ It continues to maintain a high degree of interest and support for India’s mega infrastructure projects like the Delhi-Mumbai Freight Corridor, Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor, Chennai-Bangalore Industrial Corridor and the Ahmedabad-Mumbai High Speed Rail system. The joint statement underscores the importance that Japan attaches to these projects.
  • ✓ North East integration- India’s Act east policy has North east development at its core. Japan promises to undertake several projects in the region under north East Forum. It has security (chicken neck corridor) and developmental implications for India.
  • Outside India- Asia-Africa Growth Corridor (AAGR) announced in 2017 and joint projects in some third countries like Bangladesh, Myanmar, and Sri Lanka and in Africa as well will be taken jointly. •
  • Defence ties- Quadrilateral Security Dialogue is a strategic dialogue between India, United States, Japan and Australia will be carried out.
  •  Trilateral naval exercise called Exercise Malabar involving the United States, Japan and India will be carried on continuous basis.
  • Till now India and Japan had a 2+2 dialogue at the secretary-level now they decided to have a 2+2 dialogue mechanism between Defence and Foreign ministers. This is aimed at giving political muscle to the existing diplomatic, security and defence cooperation. Both are concentrating on sharing Japanese defence technology with India.
  •  They announced the commencement of negotiations on an Acquisition and Cross-servicing Agreement. This agreement, as and when it comes into effect, would enable Japanese ships to get fuel and servicing at Indian naval bases.

MCQ

  1. The Russian-built S-400 Triumf — identified by NATO as the SA-21 Growler — is the world’s most dangerous operationally deployed modern long-range air-to-air missile system.
  2. It can engage all types of aerial targets including aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, and ballistic and cruise missiles within a range of 400 km, at an altitude up to 30 km.
  • Choose correct

(A) Only 1

(B) Only 2

(C) Both

(D) None

  • S-400  The Russian-built S-400 Triumf — identified by NATO as the SA-21 Growler — is the world’s most dangerous operationally deployed modern long-range surface-to-air missile system.
  • It is considered much more effective than the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense system developed by the US.
  • The S-400 is a mobile system that integrates multifunction radar, autonomous detection and targeting systems, anti-aircraft missile systems, launchers, and a command and control centre.
  • It can be deployed within five minutes, and is capable of firing three types of missiles to create a layered defense.
  • It can engage all types of aerial targets including aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, and ballistic and cruise missiles within a range of 400 km, at an altitude up to 30 km.

MCQ

  1. The 12th Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM12) was held in October 2018 in Brussels, Czech Republic.
  2. It is an intergovernmental process established in 1996 to foster dialogue and cooperation between 51 Asian and European countries plus two institutional partners (the EU and the Association of South East Asian Nations - ASEAN).
  • Choose correct

(A) Only 1

(B) Only 2

(C) Both

(D) None

12TH ASIA-EUROPE MEETING

  • Why in News?
  • The 12th Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM12) was held in October 2018 in Brussels, Belgium. Discussions focused on the theme "Europe and Asia: Global Partners for Global Challenges".
  • About ASEM
  • It is an intergovernmental process established in 1996 to foster dialogue and cooperation between 51 Asian and European countries plus two institutional partners (the EU and the Association of South East Asian Nations - ASEAN). India joined the forum in 2008.
  • The first summit was held in Bangkok, Thailand. It also seeks to strengthen the relationship between regions and spread peace, respect and equality.
  • It aims at promoting a more global vision among European and Asian policymakers by allowing them to exchange views on political, economic, financial, social and cultural issues. ASEM also aims at stimulating a wide range of contacts and dialogue between the two regions on topics such as education, social protection and employment, and co-operation on the protection of cultural heritage.

MCQ

  1. Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) is a cold war treaty between the two super powers (USA & USSR) signed in 1987.
  2. The cold war era treaty also covers all missiles, including those carrying nuclear warheads.
  • Choose correct

(A) Only 1

(B) Only 2

(C) Both

(D) None

Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF)

  • It is a cold war treaty between the two super powers signed in 1987.
  • The INF treaty prohibits US and Russia from possessing, producing or test-flying ground-launched cruise missiles with ranges of 500 to 5,500 kilometers.
  • The cold war era treaty also covers all land-based missiles, including those carrying nuclear warheads.
  • However, it does not cover air-launched or sea-launched weapons.
  • After World War II, the United Nations was set up as a body to promote and to maintain international peace and security.
  • The International Atomic Energy Agency was set up in 1957 to promote peaceful uses of nuclear technology and apply safeguards against the diversion of nuclear material from peaceful uses to nuclear weapons. The 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty was signed to prevent further spread of nuclear weapons technology to countries outside the five that already possessed them.
  • The Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) between the United States and Soviet Union in the late 1960s- 1970s led to further weapons control agreements.
  • The 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention was signed banning the manufacture and use of chemical weapons. The Strategic Arms Reduction Treaties were signed, as START I and START II, by the US and Soviet Union, further restricting weapons.
  • The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty was signed in 1996 banning all nuclear explosions in all environments, for military or civilian purposes, but it has not entered into force due to the nonratification.
  • The United Nations is preparing for entry into force of the Arms Trade Treaty, which has been ratified by 89 nations, pending ratification by Russia and China and United States.

MCQ

  • Report on global poverty 'Poverty and Shared Prosperity 2018: Piecing Together the Poverty Puzzle’ was released by
  1. IMF
  2. WEF
  3. WB
  4. UNG

Notable Observations

  • The percentage of people living in extreme poverty (less than $1.90 a day) globally fell to a new low. In the 25 years from 1990 to 2015, the extreme poverty rate dropped an average of a percentage point per year – from nearly 36% to 10%. But the rate dropped only one percentage point in the two years from 11% in 2013 to 10% in 2015.
  • More recently, South Asia has made impressive inroads against extreme poverty, helping to reduce the global rate further. The number of poor in South Asia dropped to 216 million people in 2015, compared to half a billion in 1990. Between 1990 and 2015, the world experienced a 25-percentage point drop in extreme poverty against a 35 percentage-point drop in South Asia. This decline in extreme poverty is much faster than in the rest of the world.
  • Extreme poverty is becoming more concentrated in Sub-Saharan Africa because of the region’s slower rates of growth, problems caused by conflict and weak institutions, and a lack of success in channeling growth into poverty reduction.
  • About half of the world’s countries now have poverty rates below 3 percent, but the report finds that the world as a whole is not on track to achieve the target of less than 3 percent of the world living in extreme poverty by 2030.
  • These contrasting regional poverty trends have two important implications: o First, the primary focus of the international community’s efforts to eliminate the worst forms of deprivation must remain firmly in Africa and those few other countries elsewhere with very high poverty rates.
  •  Also, the plight of billions of people living above US$1.90, who are still very poor by the standards of their own societies, should be taken care of